DeLaval introduces a family of low slip liners

DeLaval introduces a family of low slip liners

The DeLaval LS-01 “low slip” liner is expanding to include three additional high performing liners designed to work with a variety of milking operations. The new liners are engineered to slip less offering important benefits to producers such as improved milk flow and speed, fewer parlor routine disruptions, and better mastitis prevention and somatic cell counts.

DeLaval logo The DeLaval LS-01 SR (soft reinforcement) liner was introduced to the North American market in January 2011. It is a short milk tube that fits 10mm inlet claws. When extensively tested by DeLaval at its Hamra Farm in Sweden, competitive liners slipped twice as much as the LS-01 SR.1 Many customers in the U.S. and Canada have experienced improved milking performance since switching to this liner.

Building on this success, DeLaval is offering the following new LS-01 liners in North America:
DeLaval low slip liners
LS-01 SR 12 – A short milk tube that fits 12mm inlet claws and features a soft reinforcement that provides a more complete vacuum shut-off for barns with low vacuum reserve.

LS-01 R 12 – A short milk tube that fits 12mm inlet claws and features a reinforced (R) cogwheel-style short milk tube that is less susceptible to claw cuts if the unit is routinely dropped on a concrete parlor floor. This liner is also ideal for operations that maintain adequate to abundant vacuum reserve.

LS-01 NC – A nipple-less (NC) short milk tube that can be used with any NC-styled claw. Due to its complete vacuum shut-off during attachment, the LS-01 NC helps conserve vacuum in stanchion barns or dairy operations with low vacuum reserve.

The LS-01 is the next generation of DeLaval liners founded on important liner characteristics like milking speed, gentleness to the teat and teat end, and milk yield and flow. DeLaval and its Universal brand offer a wide range of liners that will work for any herd. The company has been manufacturing liners in the U.S. since 1918.

4.30.2012